There are 16 baboon troops on the Cape Peninsula.

Human-baboon conflict on the Cape Peninsula is exacerbated by a growing human population. Baboon monitors have been employed in the region since 1998 to prevent baboons from entering urban areas and raiding waste bins and homes for food.

Peninsula Population

A population census concluded in early January 2013 indicated that the total baboon population on the Cape Peninsula was 501. The census covered all 16 troops in the southern Peninsula, including the three splinter troops – Da Gama, Misty Cliffs and Zwaanswyk.

Under current management programmes, the Peninsula baboon population is growing steadily with an annual average of 3%, unlike wild populations where annual growth typically fluctuates depending on environmental factors such as drought and food availability. The Cape Peninsula baboon population is not endangered, nor is it under any threat. The current population estimate is 550 baboons.

Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not. – Dr. Seuss

Baboon Rangers

In July 2014 Human Wildlife Solutions (HWS) was contracted by the City of Cape Town to manage 11 troops (about 380 baboons) that enter the urban areas of the City. The company held a previous contract to manage the troops. During this period baboon management was successfully achieved and stabilised.

Trained baboon rangers are there to ensure that baboons in the managed troops are effectively kept out of suburbs that lie on the fringes of each troop’s range. The remaining troops are found primarily in the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve.

For more information about how troops are managed see Rangers.

  • Northern region: Tokai troop, Zwaanswyk troop, Mountain troop and the Constantia troop
  • South-eastern region: Smitswinkel Bay troop, Waterfall troop and two Da Gama troops
  • South-western region: Groot Olifantsbos troop, Misty Cliffs and the Slangkop troop

 

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Did You Know?

 On the Cape Peninsula, baboons are protected by law. It is illegal to poison, trap, hurt or kill a baboon by driving with the intent to kill.

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